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Lync Migration Featured Article

July 01, 2016

University of Kentucky's Analytics and Technologies Plans Skype for Business Migration

By Steve Anderson
Contributing Writer

With a holiday weekend comes unusual possibilities. While some artificially extend it with vacation or sick time, others just welcome the additional day off as a means to get some things done that they couldn't ordinarily, like a family trip or even just cleaning house. The University of Kentucky's Analytics and Technology (UKAT) department is set to launch a migration to Skype (News - Alert) for Business over the holiday weekend, letting users come back to a completely new way to connect to other users.

The migration is expected to begin 9:30 p.m. tonight, and should be complete by 8 a.m. Tuesday, limiting the overall impact of the change. As part of the migration, all currently-active UK Lync accounts—as well as any meeting data associated therein—will be migrated accordingly.

Once the move is complete, users will have access to several major new functions, including simpler methods to join meetings, a simpler overall interface, new tools for those needing to attend meetings within UKAT but not having Skype and some extra advantages for mobile users via the Skype for Business mobile app for Android, iOS and Windows Phone (News - Alert). That's available to all users, at last report, though many of the new features won't be available for Lync 2010 clients. Such clients are recommended to update to Skype for Business 2016.

It's not a surprise to see UKAT launch this migration, neither for the base reasons behind it nor for the timing. Taking advantage of an extended holiday weekend like this helps ensure the least disruption and the best chance to spot any potential problems that could occur with such a migration. Not all migrations go smoothly, and sometimes there are things that need to be fixed. With three days to work with—hopefully those involved get comp days so as not to damage morale unduly—the migration should be fairly smooth and result in a positive outcome. Once it's complete, the users will have access to an excellent collaborative platform, and given what goes on at the university level—not just business but also research into a variety of fields—collaboration might be able to save money and improve outcomes. Thus, that combination of minimal disruption and the huge slate of worthwhile effects make for several reasons to move to Skype for Business.

UKAT has likely made an excellent choice here, one that's been echoed at firms worldwide for years now. Hopefully the move will go without incident, but careful planning seems to have made the chance for real disruption minimal.




Edited by Alicia Young

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